What does the body consider “sugars?”

breads“Sugars” are any carbohydrate that is consumed.

“Sugars” include sweet substances like table sugar (sucrose,) fruit sugar (fructose,) milk sugar (lactose,) etc. (Look for words ending “ose” on labels.)

These sweet-tasting sugars can also be known as honeys, molasses, syrups, candies, and nectars.

“Sugars” also include non-sweet-tasting carbohydrates, including:

  • Breads
  • Crackers
  • Rice
  • Pasta
  • Potatoes
  • Cereals
  • Other Starchy veggies, including peas, corn, beans..

All “sugars” raise insulin levels in the bloodstream, when consumed.  When insulin levels are high, sugars are converted to fat, and all fats are stored in the body.

The trigger of insulin production is to the flavor “sweet” and although “sweet” can have differing degrees of response, please note that sugar-substitutes are also “sweet” to the brain.

It is possible to eat a low/no-fat diet and gain weight, that is stored as fat.

(photo credit)

(Nothing in this article is intended to diagnose, treat, or cure disease. It is for informational purposes only.  Always seek  and follow the advice of your professional medical doctor.)

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High Fructose Corn Syrup

High fructose corn syrup, sugar and several fruit juices are all nutritionally the same, according to Audrae Erickson, President, Corn Refiners Association. She says that High fructose corn syrup has the same number of calories as sugar and is handled similarly by the body.

The American Medical Association in June 2008 helped put to rest misunderstandings about this sweetener and obesity, stating that “high fructose syrup does not appear to contribute to obesity more than other caloric sweeteners.”

That last statement though, is the rub. If you really want to eat food with less calories, and better nutritional values, then it’s recommended to cut out the empty calories that come with ALL calorific sweeteners, including both regular sugar, and HFCS.

So TGFC still thinks it’s a good idea to avoid HFCS as part of a sensible diet regimen.

Legal “Truth” in Labeling

isthisyoursize?
On the cover, it may seem like a miracle.

nocalorie

No Calories! No Transfats!

Upon closer examination, that only applies to:

splen2

ONE TEASPOON!
One teaspoon? Do you only use one teaspoon of sugar? Would you only use one teaspoon of sugar substitute?

Katherine Prouty, of Low Carb Freedom, received an email, from the manufacturer of Splenda. In it, the company explains their claims and the real values..

http://www.lowcarbfreedom.com/2005/06/an_update_to_th.html

Low Carb Freedom: Splenda’s Real Nutritional Information: An Update to the Sweetener Post via kwout

Ah! If you make your serving size, on the product packaging, smaller, you can claim “zero” and “no” by law.

That isn’t real helpful to the consumer.

There are 48 teaspoons in a cup.

One cup of Splenda, has 24 grams of carbs. That’s twice as many carbs, as once cup of StonyField Farms Whole Milk.

One cup of Splenda has 96 calories.

We all have different diets. We all have different needs and requirements. We all must adjust these labels, to receive the accurate information, that applies, to each of us.

Just know that “NO” and “Zero” on a product’s packaging are as truthful as “No MSG,” “MSG Free,” and even, “Natural,” and many other claims, that the FDA allows, in the U.S.

Why do they feel a need to be deceptive?

While we are standing in the store, making a decision, on which product to buy.. what they show you, right there, in front of you, is all that they have, for marketing.

These products are not about “good for you,” or “healthy.” They are manufacturer’s with budget agenda’s, who want you to simply buy their product.

Do your own homework. Know what you put into your mouth, and those that you feed.

Don’t be deceived.