Excess Gas?

[ad]

When you eat or drink something sweet, do you have stomach issues?

Blueberry Croissant

Cramps, excess gas, a bloated feeling, even diarrhea and pain.

It could be that fructose is the culprit.

It’s found in many processed drinks, such as lemonade and soda, and in food such as low-fat sauces, yogurts, cereals, and more.

High Fructose Corn Syrup is trouble too.

What happens is that the fructose isn’t absorbed properly. It ends up in the colon where bacteria break it down, and turn it into acid and gas.

If this sounds like you, then try laying off anything with corn syrup in it for a few days, and see if your digestive system settles down.

Obesity In The United States

[ad]

Between 1970 and 2005 the obesity rate in the United States roughly doubled, according to data from the National Health a and Nutrition Examination Survey, and the USDA.

On the BMI scale over 30 is defined as obese; over 25 is overweight.

TruthAboutAbs

We’re eating over 200 calories more each day, most of which come from carbs. We are also eating more meat, although most of that is actually leaner than it used to be, so the calorie contribution to the average diet has gone down.

We’re taking in about 100 calories more in sweeteners each day on average, and High Fructose Corn Syrup has about half of that.

We drink less regular whole milk, and more reduced fat, and fat-free milk.

We consume a lot more oil, particularly vegetable oil, than we were back in the 1970’s. Mostly corn, and soybean and canola oils.

The increase in obesity has come about because we eat a lot more wheat; increased sweeteners, and processed oils instead of fat from meat.

Dump HFCS, and other Sugar from your Diet

The Corn Refiners Association (CRA) seemingly takes exception to any suggestion that High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is in any way to blame for the increase in Child diabetes in the United States.

The CRA loves to quote the American Medical Association (AMA) as saying that HFCS doesn’t appear to contribute more to obesity to other caloric sweeteners (such as regular sugar, for example).


However, The AMA also recommends a daily limit of 32 grams of such sweeteners. The average can of soda contains 40 grams of HFCS.

So even if HFCS in itself does no more harm than other sweeteners, we can’t get away from the fact that the average American consumes far more sweeteners of all kinds than is recommended by the AMA – over 500% more. As practically all processed food products contain HFCS, it is a major contributor to obesity, and diabetes in the USA.

The best way forward is to cut out processed foods altogether. Eat fresh fruit, vegetables, meat, pasta, diary, beans and whole grains. Check anything in a carton, box, or packet though to be sure of what you are actually eating.

Cutting out processed foods, and sweeteners, including HFCS, cannot do any harm.

New Study Shows Women At Risk From Soda

Researchers at Chicago’s Loyola University have found that women who drink more than one can of sugar-laden soda each day nearly double showing signs of developing kidney disease.

The study involved a national sample of over 9,000 men and women, and one interesting find was that the same signs were not shown in men who drink a similar amount.

It could be the excess of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most sodas, or given that mercury has also been found in HFCS, in other similar studies, this could also be a factor.

Sunny D

Water, High Fructose, Corn Syrup and 2% or Less of Each of the Following: Concentrated Juices (Orange, Tangerine, Apple, Lime, Grapefruit). Citric Acid, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Beta-Carotene, Thiamin Hydrochloride (Vitamin B1), Natural Flavors, Food Starch-Modified, Canola Oil, Cellulose Gum, Xanthan Gum, Sodium Hexametaphosphate, Sodium Benzoate To Protect Flavor, Yellow #5, Yellow #6

That’s a chemistry lab in a bottle, but it’s not the imitation fruit juice we’re talking about here, but good ole sunshine.

There has been so much press coverage about the harmful effects of exposure to the sun, that some kids are actually showing suns of rickets – a disease caused by a lack of Vitamin D, which was common in the slums of Victorian England, where there was often no access to outside areas for children to play in.

However, it’s a good idea for children, and adults, to have around a quarter of an hour’s daily exposure to sunshine, as that is the best way fro the body to naturally manufacture its own supply of this vitamin. Natural vitamins are always better than taking supplments, as the body can often assimilate them better than an artificially made product.

When at the beach in the summer, jsut enjoy the sun for 15 minutes before slathering on the sun block.


High Fructose Corn Syrup

High fructose corn syrup, sugar and several fruit juices are all nutritionally the same, according to Audrae Erickson, President, Corn Refiners Association. She says that High fructose corn syrup has the same number of calories as sugar and is handled similarly by the body.

The American Medical Association in June 2008 helped put to rest misunderstandings about this sweetener and obesity, stating that “high fructose syrup does not appear to contribute to obesity more than other caloric sweeteners.”

That last statement though, is the rub. If you really want to eat food with less calories, and better nutritional values, then it’s recommended to cut out the empty calories that come with ALL calorific sweeteners, including both regular sugar, and HFCS.

So TGFC still thinks it’s a good idea to avoid HFCS as part of a sensible diet regimen.

Eat Well, Eat Healthy, Eat Cheap

You CAN eat good healthy food, AND it doesn’t have to cost a fortune either.

  • Make a list of what you need before you go out. It’ll stop you buying junk, and keep you within your budget.
  • Be sure to read the labels at the store when buying new products or brands that are not familiar to you.
  • Avoid anything with High Fructose Corn Syrup in as this is simply a source of empty calories. Watch out for high sugar, and high fat and sodium contents too.
  • Go around the perimeter of the store. It always seems to work! Fresh Produce, and diary, and meat and fish seems to be around the edges, with all the junk stuff in the center aisles.
  • Do not ever go grocery shopping when you are hungry. Eat first, and you won’t be tempted to fill the cart with stuff you don’t really need, and certainly not candy and cakes and extra cookies.