Obesity In The United States

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Between 1970 and 2005 the obesity rate in the United States roughly doubled, according to data from the National Health a and Nutrition Examination Survey, and the USDA.

On the BMI scale over 30 is defined as obese; over 25 is overweight.

TruthAboutAbs

We’re eating over 200 calories more each day, most of which come from carbs. We are also eating more meat, although most of that is actually leaner than it used to be, so the calorie contribution to the average diet has gone down.

We’re taking in about 100 calories more in sweeteners each day on average, and High Fructose Corn Syrup has about half of that.

We drink less regular whole milk, and more reduced fat, and fat-free milk.

We consume a lot more oil, particularly vegetable oil, than we were back in the 1970’s. Mostly corn, and soybean and canola oils.

The increase in obesity has come about because we eat a lot more wheat; increased sweeteners, and processed oils instead of fat from meat.

Legal “Truth” in Labeling

isthisyoursize?
On the cover, it may seem like a miracle.

nocalorie

No Calories! No Transfats!

Upon closer examination, that only applies to:

splen2

ONE TEASPOON!
One teaspoon? Do you only use one teaspoon of sugar? Would you only use one teaspoon of sugar substitute?

Katherine Prouty, of Low Carb Freedom, received an email, from the manufacturer of Splenda. In it, the company explains their claims and the real values..

http://www.lowcarbfreedom.com/2005/06/an_update_to_th.html

Low Carb Freedom: Splenda’s Real Nutritional Information: An Update to the Sweetener Post via kwout

Ah! If you make your serving size, on the product packaging, smaller, you can claim “zero” and “no” by law.

That isn’t real helpful to the consumer.

There are 48 teaspoons in a cup.

One cup of Splenda, has 24 grams of carbs. That’s twice as many carbs, as once cup of StonyField Farms Whole Milk.

One cup of Splenda has 96 calories.

We all have different diets. We all have different needs and requirements. We all must adjust these labels, to receive the accurate information, that applies, to each of us.

Just know that “NO” and “Zero” on a product’s packaging are as truthful as “No MSG,” “MSG Free,” and even, “Natural,” and many other claims, that the FDA allows, in the U.S.

Why do they feel a need to be deceptive?

While we are standing in the store, making a decision, on which product to buy.. what they show you, right there, in front of you, is all that they have, for marketing.

These products are not about “good for you,” or “healthy.” They are manufacturer’s with budget agenda’s, who want you to simply buy their product.

Do your own homework. Know what you put into your mouth, and those that you feed.

Don’t be deceived.