Chemical is as Chemical does..

Steviol is the basic building block of stevia'...

Today, we are over-bombarded with a slew of chemicals that we call “sugar substitutes.”

“Sugar Substitutes” are toted as big serendipity inventions.

Acesulfame Potassium, Aspartame, Sucralose, Saccharin, Neotame (made by NutraSweet) and Cyclamate, are better known, to some of us, as:

  • Sunnet
  • Sweet One
  • Equal
  • NutraSweet
  • Canderel
  • E951
  • Splenda
  • Altern
  • Sucraplus
  • E955
  • Benzoic Sulfinide
  • E954
  • INS 961

and are made, in processes, that include:

  • sulfonation
  • sulfamic acid
  • sulfur trioxide
  • anthranilic acid
  • nitrous acid
  • sulfur dioxide
  • chlorine
  • ammonia

and break down into substances such as:

  • aspartic acid
  • phenylalanine
  • methanol
  • formaldehyde
  • formic acid
  • diktopiperazine

What does all of this mean?  It means that chemical substitutes have a recipe.  They must have a recipe to be patented.  They are only important to manufacturer’s because they are profitable.

They make them money.

Did you know that Splenda is Chlorinated Sugar?  Does that make you want to eat more of it?

Stevia is a plant, that grows in the ground.  Stevia has been blocked and banned, from the US, by the FDA, for many different reasons, in the past.  Now that companies are making a recipe, with it, it has been approved.

This is very concerning.

Manufacturer’s of other sugar-substitutes, at risk of losing their own fortunes, fought against the approval of Stevia.  Stevia, as itself, can not be patented.

Rebianna is a recipe.  It is a sugar-substitute that is made from Stevia.  Please keep in mind that Sucralose is made from Sugar, when you consider if this is a good thing or not.

Moderation is best.  Balance is best.  “Real Natural,” in “as whole of a product, as possible,” is best.

The only real fortune to the invention of chemical sweeteners is the money that is made!

(Image via Wikipedia)

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Legal “Truth” in Labeling

isthisyoursize?
On the cover, it may seem like a miracle.

nocalorie

No Calories! No Transfats!

Upon closer examination, that only applies to:

splen2

ONE TEASPOON!
One teaspoon? Do you only use one teaspoon of sugar? Would you only use one teaspoon of sugar substitute?

Katherine Prouty, of Low Carb Freedom, received an email, from the manufacturer of Splenda. In it, the company explains their claims and the real values..

http://www.lowcarbfreedom.com/2005/06/an_update_to_th.html

Low Carb Freedom: Splenda’s Real Nutritional Information: An Update to the Sweetener Post via kwout

Ah! If you make your serving size, on the product packaging, smaller, you can claim “zero” and “no” by law.

That isn’t real helpful to the consumer.

There are 48 teaspoons in a cup.

One cup of Splenda, has 24 grams of carbs. That’s twice as many carbs, as once cup of StonyField Farms Whole Milk.

One cup of Splenda has 96 calories.

We all have different diets. We all have different needs and requirements. We all must adjust these labels, to receive the accurate information, that applies, to each of us.

Just know that “NO” and “Zero” on a product’s packaging are as truthful as “No MSG,” “MSG Free,” and even, “Natural,” and many other claims, that the FDA allows, in the U.S.

Why do they feel a need to be deceptive?

While we are standing in the store, making a decision, on which product to buy.. what they show you, right there, in front of you, is all that they have, for marketing.

These products are not about “good for you,” or “healthy.” They are manufacturer’s with budget agenda’s, who want you to simply buy their product.

Do your own homework. Know what you put into your mouth, and those that you feed.

Don’t be deceived.

Hello Stevia

Ever heard of it? TGFC suspects that many people haven’t. It’s been used as a zero-calorie sweetener for many years in other countries, but the US FDA has taken its time on approving it, on the grounds of safety.

Perhaps, it was more a case of the food processing giants not wanting to make a switch from products such as Equal and Splenda?

Coca Cola and Pepsi are ready to include it in some of their drinks, and it’s now been given approval for use.

What is Stevia?

It comes from the Stevia plant. The leaves are naturally sweet, and the products derived from these leaves are highly concentrated.

The jury is still out on what effects existing artificial sweeteners have on the body, and of course there is, of yet, no long-term data available for Stevia.

TFGC’s take on it is still the same, use natural cane sugar, and use as little as possible. Work towards cutting sugars and/or sweeteners from your diet.

Quit drinking soda of all kinds, and drink more water instead. Watch out for restaurant items, and eat fresh and not processed food.